Inside the history
Langoris, Nangoris, Angoris

Inside the history
Langoris, Nangoris, Angoris

The history of Tenuta di Angoris is considered to have begun between February 7th 1644 and June 8th 1647, when Ferdinand III, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, donated 300 fields in Novali (in the territory of Cormons) to Locatello Locatelli, Baron of Eulenburg and Schönfeld. Historically this was at the time of the Thirty Years’ War, which ended in 1648 with the Peace of Westphalia. It is understood that Ferdinand III’s donation concerned land sites in the locality of Langoris and Monte Quarin, which is still part of the estate today. Angoris is a common toponym in Friuli and derives from the vulgar Latin “longória“, i.e. long field, strip of land, or even Langoris or Nangoris.

The history of the Locatelli family has always been linked to Angoris. Founded in 1648 by Baron Locatello Locatelli, since 1968 it has been managed by the family of Giulio Locatelli: his son Luciano before him and his granddaughter Marta is now keeping alive this estate and the fruits that the land donates. In recent years, the company image and wines are experiencing a much-appreciated revival by those who admire wine and the territory.

 

We pay tribute to our land, protecting and enhancing it thanks to a sustainable production that allows us to produce wines in the three main DOC areas of the region, in total respect of the environment: Collio, Friuli Colli Orientali and Friuli Isonzo.

 

Inside the history: Langoris, Nangoris, Angoris

 

The history of Tenuta di Angoris is considered to have begun between February 7th 1644 and June 8th 1647, when Ferdinand III, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, donated 300 fields in Novali (in the territory of Cormons) to Locatello Locatelli, Baron of Eulenburg and Schönfeld. Historically this was at the time of the Thirty Years’ War, which ended in 1648 with the Peace of Westphalia. It is understood that Ferdinand III’s donation concerned land sites in the locality of Langoris and Monte Quarin, which is still part of the estate today. Angoris is a common toponym in Friuli and derives from the vulgar Latin “longória“, i.e. long field, strip of land, or even Langoris or Nangoris.

The exact date of the building of the villa is not known. In the pastoral visit of Archbishop Attems, on April 9th 1753, there is evidence that there was an extra Oppidum church annexed (outside the city), dedicated to all saints and protectors against storms and adversities. Perhaps as a legacy of this, until a few years ago, the signal to alert the beginning and the end of a hailstone storm was fired from Angoris when hail clouds could be seen approaching.

In the summary of the cadastral maps of the Passariano Department year 1811, Giorgio Locatelli is found Giorgio Locatelli to be the owner of the Villa, and the buildings are described as “holiday house and Court”.

On December 6th 1916, at the height of the Italian military occupation during the First World War, the seizure of Baron Giorgio Locatelli’s property is noted, seizure that ended on June 7th 1919 with the return of the assets. First, however, at the beginning of the war the villa and land behind it were requisitioned and made available to the Italian Army, which used the Villa as a military hospital. The land behind the villa, which stretches to the current overpass, was used as a cemetery. Almost 1,500 Italian soldiers were buried there (but also some Austrians), especially those deceased in the hospital itself.

 

At the time of Baroness Elena, the villa was enlarged; This introduces us to the importance of the social events that have characterized the estate, like the hunting, organized by Baron Pirro in the Angoris reserve. Another social event, which many more adult people will remember, happened when Count Miani hosted all the cast of the film “Addio alle armi” (A Farewell to Arms) in the Villa of Angoris. This was the second version produced by the Hollywood studios in 1957, when some external shots were filmed in Venzone. The Villa was used for several days by the director Charles Vidor and the actors Rock Hudson, Jennifer Jones, Kurt Koszanar, as well as Italian actors such as Vittorio De Sica and Alberto Sordi.

More recently, the director Roberto Dordit chose Villa Locatelli as a backdrop for some sequences of his feature film filmed in the region in 2003 “Apnea” (Apnoea) that saw the interpretation of the actors Claudio Santamaria, Fabrizia Sacchi, Michela Noonan and Diego Ribon.

The director Liliana Cavani also filmed most of her film “Troppo amore” (Too much love) here In September 2010, (shown in March 2012) with actors Antonia Liskova, Massimo Poggio and Carla Cassola.

Also, the second edition of the successful RAI television series “La porta Rossa” (The red door) was set in Angoris: in June 2018, in fact, three scenes were filmed by the director Carmine Elia among the old barrels in the cellar, in the tasting room and in Villa Locatelli.

It wouldn’t be possible to close this brief introduction about the Tenuta di Angoris without mentioning also the importance that it has had in the agricultural economic context of Cormons; Many wines were produced and bottled already during the Austro-Hungarian period, of which many labels are still available today such as: Picolit, Ribolla, Verduzzo, Riesling, Refosco and Tokayer, as testimony to their diffusion in the lands of the Empire. Cormons in that time, thanks to the construction of the Southern Railroad, was an important centre not only for production, but also for the marketing of fruits and wines. During the 1950s Count Miani was among the first bottlers in Cormons.

We must also mention the breeding of thoroughbred horses (of which the count was a great enthusiast), the peach orchards that turned the countryside of Angoris on the road towards Mariano into an immense pink carpet. They were early varieties, demanded by the markets and generations of young people and students were devoted to the harvest, while the sorting was done by the attentive eyes of many girls and women from Cormons.

We end this narrative with a memory, linked to the childhood of many people from the area : the small zoo annexed to the Villa that hosted a lion for several years: he was called Dolfo, and was old and, albeit limited in cramped spaces surrounded by bars, but he stood there, motionless, with its Majestic Mane, almost wanting to witness the importance and royalty of the Tenuta di Langoris.

 

 

Historical notes drawn from the research of Giovanni Battista Panzera

Sparkling wines

Villa Locatelli line

Angoris line

Riserva
Giulio Locatelli